Marianslibrary’s Review of The Mapmaker’s Children by Sarah McCoy

  

I became at a young age very inquisitive about the life of abolitionist John Brown and the infamous event at Harper’s Ferry. As I grew older, I continued to read historical non-fictional and fictional books about John Brown and the raid on Harper’s Ferry.  When I learned Sarah McCoy’s next project would be a historical fictional book based on John Brown’s daughter, Sarah Brown, I was thrilled!  My dear author friend via telepathic transmission must have known I would find this historical subject matter most pleasurable and appealing!
Sarah McCoy has brought to life the abolitionist work of Sarah Brown after the death of her father at Charlestown, Virginia (now Charles Town, West Virginia) in 1859.  Shortly before John Brown died, he shared his legacy with his family concerning the abolitionist movement. “The abolishment of slavery does not end with me. You must carry on.”  Sarah made a vow to her father to carry on his wishes and in doing so, continued to support the struggle of the Underground Railroad.  Using her artistic ability as a painter she intertwined maps and routes into her paintings, inadvertently becoming a mapmaker.  While she continued with her father’s work romance ensued between Freddy, a family friend.  A childhood disease had left her barren and she feared she could not marry and not be truthful to Freddy about her condition. Therefore, Sarah’s quest to fight for the rights of others became her passion in life.

Sarah McCoy as only she can accomplish, connected the past and present exquisitely. She introduced Eden Anderson of New Charlestown, West Virginia, located near Harpers Ferry. She was a wife suffering with the anguish of infertility which caused a rift in their marriage. Recently she and her husband had moved into a time-worn home where Eden discovered a decrepit root cellar. Hidden in the cellar was a head of a very old porcelain doll sporting one black eye and one green eye.  Eden began to unravel the mystery behind this discovery when her young, spunky, and ever-curious neighbor, Cleo, came to her aid. Eden soon uncovered the connection that the doll head and her home had ties to Sarah Brown and the Underground Railroad.

The Mapmaker’s Children combined with the historical aspect of the era, was also a love story that dealt with two women’s lives who came to terms with their personal choices. Sarah McCoy’s style of writing is superior as she tells the story of these two individuals who, even though time separates them, share similar angsts. The story of Eden and Sarah told in alternating chapters, escalates both of their personal experiences in a smooth and transitional manner.  From the onset, she has done her historical background homework for The Mapmaker’s Children. The book is very well researched concerning depicting Sarah Brown’s time period.  It’s not difficult to be swept into the lives of both Eden and Sarah and have empathy for them as they journey through their personal struggles especially their inability to bear children.  Both women across time and history discover their true destiny and what is most important in their lives.  Eden surmised it best, “We can’t force life to do what we want when we want it.  We can’t change yesterday or control tomorrow. We can only live today as best we can.  And it just might turn out better than expected.”


It is with such a proud feeling, like that of a mother, that I personally congratulate Sarah McCoy on yet another very truly compelling story!! I am completely exuberant to announce the newest book, by New York Times Best Selling Author Sarah McCoy!!!  The Mapmaker’s Children hits the shelves on May 5th!  

Happy Reading!

Sent from my iPad

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